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Mario vs. Donkey Kong
Box artwork for Mario vs. Donkey Kong.
Developer(s) Nintendo Software Technology
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Distributor(s) 3DS Virtual Console
Release date(s)
Game Boy Advance icon.png
Game Boy Advance
Nintendo 3DS icon.png
Nintendo 3DS
Genre(s) Platform, Puzzle
System(s) Game Boy Advance, Nintendo 3DS
Players 1
Rating(s)
ESRB: ESRB E.png Everyone
PEGI: PEGI 3.png Ages 3+
Followed by Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis
Series Mario vs. Donkey Kong
Neoseeker Related Pages

Mario vs. Donkey Kong is the spiritual successor to Donkey Kong on the Game Boy. It was originally released on the Game Boy Advance in 2004 and later released on the Nintendo 3DS in 2011 to 3DS Ambassadors.

Donkey Kong sees a commercial for the new Mini-Mario toy and decides to get one. Unfortunately, they are sold out, so he goes to the factory and steals them. Mario chases after him to recover the stolen toys.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong is a 2004 puzzle game with platform elements developed by Nintendo Software Technology and released for the Game Boy Advance. The game is the spiritual successor to Donkey Kong, which was released in 1994 for the Game Boy. The game's first sequel, Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis, was released on the Nintendo DS in 2006.

The game concept revolves around a combination of platform and puzzle elements, challenging Mario to find keys, reach a locked door, and rescue mini-Marios.

The game is an evolution of Donkey Kong Plus, a title on display at E3 2002. During the show, Plus had a feature that allowed players to design and save their own levels on the GameCube, then copy them across to the Game Boy Advance using a link cable. It was essentially an updated version of Donkey Kong for the Game Boy, but Donkey Kong Plus disappeared by the following year. It was replaced with the pre-rendered graphics and gameplay additions of Mario vs. Donkey Kong. The Create-a-Level feature was removed from this version (but appears in its sequel).

It is a little known fact that this game has a hidden e-Reader support. Nintendo of Japan had a competition where 1,000 people won cards. However, there is space for twelve levels, and there were only five cards released. They are considered to be among the rarest of e-Cards.

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