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Mappy Kids
Box artwork for Mappy Kids.
Japanese titleマッピーキッズ
Developer(s)Namco
Publisher(s)Namco
Release date(s)
Genre(s)Platform
System(s)Famicom
Mode(s)Single player, Multiplayer
Preceded byMappy-Land
Followed byMappy Arrangement
SeriesMappy
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Mappy Kids (マッピーキッズ, lit. Mappī Kizzu), is a platform game that was released by Namco for the Famicom on December 22, 1989 (only in Japan); it is the fourth title in the Mappy series, and the only one which did not see a release for the United States. The player(s) must take control of Mappy's two sons Happy (who wears a red hat and bandanna) and Rappy (who wears a blue hat and bandanna), who both want to find a wife, but neither of them can marry until they have become providers for their families - and, in order to do that, they have to accumulate as much Yen as they can over a selection of fifteen out of sixteen (five out of nine for the two-player mode) stages then fight to keep it in one of three Nyamco-refereed minigames against a Mewky (for the two-player mode, Mappy's sons have to compete against each other instead of a Mewky, and the "Flags" game is also impossible for players who cannot read Japanese). If either player loses a minigame, they will also lose 20000 Yen; both of Mappy's sons use their money to buy parts (for building a house with), but if they later spin a skull on the virtual slot machine before the next minigame then they shall lose one of their accumulated parts and have to spin again (however, if they spin a Super Mario Bros.-style question box, they may earn another part for winning the minigame, or a considerable amount of Yen that they can buy one with).

In 2013, an English translation of the game was released by Zynk Oxhyde; in addition to changing the game's font, they also changed some of the character sprites (including the elephant in the shop, who now has a longer trunk), and made the "Flags" game possible for players who cannot read Japanese.

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