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Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2
Box artwork for Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2.
Developer(s)
PlayStation 2 icon.png
PlayStation 2
Dimps
Nintendo GameCube icon.png
Nintendo GameCube
Pyramid
Publisher(s)
PlayStation 2 icon.png
PlayStation 2
Nintendo GameCube icon.png
Nintendo GameCube
Atari
Release date(s)
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PlayStation 2
Nintendo GameCube icon.png
Nintendo GameCube
Genre(s) Fighting
System(s) PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube
Rating(s)
ESRB: ESRB T.png Teen
PEGI: PEGI 12.png Ages 12+
ACB: OFLC PG.svg Parental Guidance
CERO: CERO A.jpg All ages
Preceded by Dragon Ball Z: Budokai
Followed by Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 3
Series Dragon Ball Z: Budokai
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Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2, released as Dragon Ball Z 2 (ドラゴンボールZ2 Doragon Bōru Zetto Tsū?) in Japan, is a fighting game based upon the popular anime series, Dragon Ball Z. Budokai 2 is a sequel to Dragon Ball Z: Budokai and was developed by Dimps and published by Atari for the PlayStation 2 and Nintendo GameCube. It was released for the PlayStation 2 in North America on December 4, 2003, and on the Nintendo GameCube on December 15, 2004. The game was published in Japan by Bandai, and released for the PlayStation 2 on February 5, 2004.

The game's features include a tournament stage, versus mode, and an item shop. The story mode in the game is known as Dragon World, and plays like a board game as the player assembles a team of Z-fighters to challenge the various enemies in the series starting from the Saiyan Saga up to the final Kid Buu Saga. The game has a total of 31 playable characters including fusions of different fighters, and Majin Buu's various forms. The Japanese version of the game added several new costumes, as well as a new stage in the game's story mode. Some of the added costumes were added to the North American release of the GameCube version.

Once again, the North American versions feature English voice acting from the North American Funimation dub. The European PlayStation 2 version also features it, while the later European GameCube version switched back to the original Japanese voice acting because of negative feedback from most European Dragon Ball fans which were used to the Japanese dub since the 16-bit era.

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