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Operation Wolf
Box artwork for Operation Wolf.
Developer(s) Taito
Publisher(s) Taito
Distributor(s) Wii Virtual Console
Release date(s)
Arcade icon.png
Arcade
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NES
Genre(s) Light gun
System(s) Arcade, Commodore 64/128, NES, Sega Master System, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, DOS, FM Towns, MSX, TurboGrafx-16, Wii, ZX Spectrum
Mode(s) Single player
Followed by Operation Thunderbolt
Series Operation Wolf
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Operation Wolf is a one-player shooter video game made by Taito in 1987. It was ported to various home systems and spawned three sequels: Operation Thunderbolt (1988), Operation Wolf 3 (1994) and Operation Tiger (1998).

Description[edit]

The object of the game is to rescue the five hostages in the concentration camp. The game is divided into six stages: Communication Setup, Jungle, Village, Powder Magazine, Concentration Camp, and Airport. Completion of each stage advances the story. For example, upon completing the Jungle stage, an enemy leader is interrogated and the location of the enemy's concentration camp is found. This was one of the first shooter games to feature a storyline, and it had some similarities to real special operations missions.

Stages[edit]

The game is controlled with a fixed swivel mounted light gun controller attached to the cabinet, with force feedback to simulate recoil. In order to complete each stage, the player must shoot as many soldiers, tanks, jeeps, choppers, and boats as the game requires. Soldiers can throw hand grenades and knives, and vehicles can shoot missiles and launch rockets. The player's ammunition and grenades are limited, but can be stocked up by shooting barrels and crates or by shooting animals such as chickens and pigs. Occasionally a high-powered machine gun power-up appears, allowing the player's gun to have unlimited ammo and an increased rate of fire for 10 seconds.

The player has a damage bar that increases each time he is hit. The damage bar also increases if a civilian or hostage is shot. Energy boost items randomly appear which, if shot, decrease damage by five points. If the bar reaches maximum or the player runs out of ammunition, the game ends.

Table of Contents

Appendices