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Amstrad CPC[edit]

Amstrad CPC

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986.

Apple II[edit]

Apple II

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1986.

Atari 8-bit[edit]

Atari 8-bit

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1985.

Atari ST[edit]

Atari ST

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1987.

Commodore 64[edit]

Commodore 64

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986.

MS-DOS (CGA)[edit]

MS-DOS (CGA)

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Mindscape Inc. in 1988.

Mobile (J2ME)[edit]

Mobile (J2ME)

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by I-Play on September 8, 2004. Fairly faithful graphics but a small viewing area and no multiplayer.

Sinclair ZX Spectrum[edit]

Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and relesaed by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1986. One to two players only.

MSX[edit]

MSX

Developed by Atari and released by U.S. Gold in 1986.

Sega Master System[edit]

Sega Master System

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by U.S. Gold Ltd. in 1990. The graphics have been adjusted to look better with the Master Systems' limited palette. Interestingly, it shows the number of credits the player has remaining (other versions hide this information in the pause screen).

Game Boy Advance[edit]

Game Boy Advance

Developed by EC Interactive and released by Destination Software, Inc. on November 3, 2005 as part of the Gauntlet/Rampart two-pack. This version has very accurate graphics and sound but, oddly, is only single player (despite the Game Boy Advance's multiplayer capabilities).

Xbox Live Arcade[edit]

Xbox Live Arcade

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Midway Games Inc. on November 22, 2005. This is no mere port; like other Xbox Live Arcade titles, this version includes upscaled graphics (approximately 64×64, compared to the original's comparatively small 16×16).

It also includes online co-op as well as Achievements (which earn the player Gamer Points), both of which are usual features of Xbox Live Arcade titles. Other than the graphics update, the levels and screen perspective are true to the original, and there are no additional levels or modes.

Noteworthy[edit]

NES[edit]

NES

Like the later Sega Genesis version, the NES version takes the "more than a port" route. It replaces the original level set with an entirely new array of even less linear levels, complete with world maps like those of Super Mario Bros. 3, allowing the player to plot their course through the game. There is also new music, and many new items. It also adds an actual storyline, which even explains why only two can play simultaneously.

Among the sacrifices made in the conversion are significantly reduced graphics, support for only two players, and no narration (character voices heard when hurt or eating remain).

See Gauntlet (NES) for the separate guide for this version.

PlayChoice-10[edit]

PlayChoice-10

The NES version later returned to the arcade as a game for Nintendo's PlayChoice-10 hardware. The only real changes (other than the time limit imposed by the PlayChoice-10 hardware itself) were a slightly larger visible play area and additional help tips at the top.

See Gauntlet (NES) for the separate guide for this version.

Sega Genesis[edit]

Sega Genesis

Developed by Atari Games Corporation and released by Tengen in 1993 as part of Gauntlet IV. True to its name, Gauntlet IV was more than just a port; in addition to the original game recreated as faithfully as the technology allows it also includes Record Mode (where players can track more detailed high scores and save/restore their game), Battle Mode (where players can face off in a randomly-selected arena), and also Quest Mode, an all-new RPG that extends the Gauntlet mechanics to include money, EXP gain and more inventory items.

Tandy (TRS-80 Color Computer)[edit]

Gantelet (TRS-80 Color Computer)

Written by Dave Dies and published by Diecom Products in 1986. Gantelet is a clone for the TRS-80 Color Computer line. It features only 15 levels, but lets three players play simultaneously and retains all the gameplay of the original. If you have the Sound/Speech cartridge the game has voices, saying similar things to the arcade original. It was followed by a sequel called Gantelet II, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Atari ST[edit]

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Commodore Amiga[edit]

Garrison (Commodore Amiga)

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Commodore 64[edit]

Garrison (Commodore 64)

Developed by Digital Dreams and published by Rainbow Arts in 1987. Garrison is a clone rather than a licensed version. It adds an additional character, the Dwarf, and makes some cosmetic changes (such as rock guitar music during the intro), but is largely faithful to the original. Followed by a sequel called Garrison II: The Legend Continues, in turn a clone of Gauntlet II.

Atari 800[edit]

Dandy Dungeon (Atari 800)

While on the surface Dandy Dungeon appears to be a Gauntlet clone with some major omissions, the 1983 copyright says otherwise—it was originally released through the Atari Program Exchange (APX) and was written by then-MIT-student John Palevich. Ed Logg was inspired by it, and designed Gauntlet in its image. John wasn't all too pleased, but the matter was settled out of court.

Dandy Dungeon does not feature character differences, diminishing health, and various other improvements Ed made, but it did feature four-player support, a shared food inventory, and a level editor. A reprogrammed version called Dark Chambers was later released, this time licensed from John.